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Monday, April 11, 2016

Prison Time for Former CEO’s Role in 2010 Mine Explosion

From Powder/Bulk Solids

Prison Time for Former CEO’s Role in 2010 Mine Explosion

April 7, 2016



A former CEO of Massey Energy was sentenced to a year in prison on Wednesday at the US District Court in Charleston, WV for a conspiracy to falsify dust samples in the wake of what is said to be the
the deadliest American coal mine explosion in decades.

Don Blankenship, who headed the company until 2010, will spend one year in prison and faces fines of $250,000 following his conviction in December on a misdemeanor charge of conspiring to violate federal mine safety laws.

In April 2010, 29 miners died in Massey’s Upper Big Branch Mine in Montcoal, WV after a coal dust explosion. Investigators determined that faulty cutting equipment ignited a build-up of coal dust and methane gas, according to an Associated Press report.

Responding in a statement to Blankenship’s sentence, US Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez said that the punishment may offer some condolences to the families of the late miners, while sending a message to the coal industry.

“This sentence proves that no mine operator is above the law, and should send a strong signal to unscrupulous employers that skirt safety rules. No prison sentence and no amount of money can bring back the 29 men who lost their lives at Upper Big Branch, but my sincere hope is that this sentence can offer some measure of closure for the families of those miners,” said Secretary Perez.

The secretary of labor opined that more stringent laws are needed to prevent similar accidents in the future.

“That said this is a clear case of the punishment not fitting the crime. This sentence is the maximum allowable under the law, but regrettably, the criminal provisions of the Mine Act are far too weak to
truly hold accountable those who put miners’ lives at risk,” Secretary Perez said. “This administration continues to support efforts in Congress to strengthen those penalties, and we stand ready to work with members who believe that no worker should lose their life for a paycheck.”

Massey Energy was acquired by Bristol, VA-based Alpha Natural Resources in June 2011.


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Thursday, March 17, 2016

Quesnel mill explosion could have been deadly - British Columbia

From British Columbia - CBC News

Quesnel mill explosion could have been deadly

Dust may be factor in explosion and fire


By Betsy Trumpener, CBC News
Posted: Mar 10, 2016 4:48 PM PT
Last Updated: Mar 10, 2016 5:01 PM PT

Safety officials say a fire and explosion at West Fraser's WestPine MDF plant, Wednesday, could have been catastrophic.
Safety officials say a fire and explosion at West Fraser's WestPine MDF plant, Wednesday, could have been catastrophic. (Erika Steinson/Facebook)
A fire and explosion Wednesday at a Quesnel mill could have been catastrophic and deadly, says Al Johnson, Vice President of Prevention Field Services for WorkSafeBC.

Thirty workers inside West Fraser's WestPine MDF plant were evacuated safely.
It took crews almost five hours to put out the fire.

Potential for serious injuries, death

"There was the potential here for being catastrophic," said Johnson. "We're very fortunate there were no injuries. There was a potential for workers to be seriously injured or worse."

A critical incident response team was sent to Quesnel to offer emotional support.

"[The explosion] will resonate with people and possibly bring back memories of explosions in mills that have occurred in the past," said Johnson.

2012 mill explosions killed 4, injured 43 

Four B.C. mill workers were killed and 43 others seriously injured in 2012 after sawmill explosions in Burns Lake and Prince George just three months apart.

Investigators determined wood dust was to blame for the tragedies.

Johnson says wood dust could also be a factor in the most recent incident in Quesnel.

'Wood dust present'

There is wood dust present, so there may be an association. We haven't drawn any conclusions. - WorkSafeBC Vice President Al Johnson
"It's too early to say at this point, but obviously there's indicators this explosion and fire occurred in the fiber bin area.

It has four dust collection towers where there is wood dust present, so there may be an association," said Johnson. "But we haven't drawn any conclusions at this point."

Johnson says it's important to note the 2012 explosions occurred in sawmills, while the Quesnel mill produces medium density fibreboard.

"This mill has wood dust and wood fibres, like the sawmills. But it also uses high temperatures, high pressure chemicals."

"Without question, it was a major explosion and fire," said Quesnel mayor Bob Simpson who has worked in mill management.

Johnson says WorkSafe's investigation to determine what happened could take months.

Damage closes mill

In the meantime, West Fraser says the Quesnel mill will be closed until the damage to the WestPine MDF plant is fixed.

"The facility will not be operational for a period of time," said Tara Knight, a spokeswoman for West Fraser.

"Our employees remain employed and are needed to return the mill to operation. 


Betsy Trumpener is an award-winning journalist and author. She's been covering the news in central and northern British Columbia for more than 15 years.

Related Stories

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

NFPA Hazard Rating System

NFPA Hazard Rating System from Northeastern University

NFPA Hazard Rating System

Northeastern University's laboratory doors are posted with emergency information to warn occupants
and The Boston Fire Department personnel of the presence and identification of hazardous materials inside each laboratory. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has developed a system for
indicating the health, flammability, reactivity and special hazards for many common chemicals through use of the NFPA 704 Diamond. The hazard rating for the laboratory is determined by looking at all the chemicals, gases and special lab uses in the laboratory and coming up with a rating for each hazard category based on criteria established below.

Please read the rating information in each category, take an inventory of your laboratory and rate each category accordingly. To look up a rating for a particular chemical click on the link at the bottom
of the page. If you do not find the chemical listed, a review of the chemicals MSDS sheet may help you rate the chemical in question. To look up a chemicals MSDS click on the "MSDS" link at the bottom of the page.

If there are any questions regarding a chemical rating, please either email your question or call the Office of Environmental Health and Safety at x2769.

If you have a new laboratory or are a new Principal Investigator, please contact EHS: ehs@neu.edu

Rating Summary

Health

Use the most severe rating code regardless of volume.

Health (Blue) Detailed Description of Health Rating

4 Danger May be fatal on short exposure. Specialized protective equipment
required
3 Warning Corrosive or toxic. Avoid skin contact or inhalation
2 Warning May be harmful if inhaled or absorbed
1 Caution May be irritating
0

No unusual hazard

Flammability

The greatest volume of one code determines the marking. The only exception is if a more severe code has a volume of 3 gallons or greater, then that code is used instead of a lower code of greater volume. If the laboratory total volume of flammables or combustibles is less than one pint for all, then the rating for the laboratory for this area shall be zero


Flammability (Red)Detailed
Description of Flammable Rating


4 Danger Flammable gas or extremely flammable liquid
3 Warning Flammable liquid flash point below 100°F
2 Caution Combustible liquid flash point of 100° to 200°F
1

Combustible if heated
0

Not combustible

Reactivity

Use the most severe rating code regardless of volume.

Reactivity (Yellow) Detailed
Description of Reactivity Rating


4 Danger Explosive material at room temperature
3 Danger May be explosive if shocked, heated under confinement or mixed
with water
2 Warning Unstable or may react violently if mixed with water
1 Caution May react if heated or mixed with water but not violently
0 Stable Not reactive when mixed with water

Special Information

Indicate the presence of the following regardless
of volume


Special Information Key
(White)
Detailed Description of Special Information Rating

Oxy Oxidizing Agent
W Water Reactive
G Compressed Gas
LN2 Liquid Nitrogen
LHE Liquid Helium

Special Signage Key (These are signs that
shall or must be posted in addition to the NFPA diamond)

LAS Laser
BL Biosafety Level
RAD Radioactive Material
X-Ray X-Ray Diffractometer
MAG Magnetic Fields
HVO High Voltage
NFPA Hazard Rating A - C
NFPA Hazard Rating D - I
NFPA Hazard Rating J - R
NFPA Hazard Rating S - Z
NFPA Rating Gases
NFPA Rating Rating - Text Version
Material Safety Data Sheets


Tuesday, March 15, 2016

LED technology reduces explosion risks

From ISHN Industrial Safety & Hygiene News

LED technology reduces explosion risks
The complex and hazardous nature of confined spaces
present numerous risks for workers. Because of this, many businesses that
operate in hazardous locations make use of explosion proof lights to prevent
the ignition of flammable gases and dust particles. This article discusses how
LED technology has contributed to the features of explosion proof lights by
making them more reliable, sturdy and cost-effective.


Click here for complete story

Industrial Ventilation Resources

Free IV/LEV resource

If you are looking for information on or specialize in Industrial Ventilation (Known as LEV in the UK) then you may be interested to know that there is a free to use resource www.levcentral.com

There is a growing library of resources, details of professional development, forum and suppliers directory. We hope you will find it a valuable resource.

Monday, March 7, 2016

Friday, March 4, 2016

What is Industrial Safety?

Definition from Safeopedia

Definition - What does Industrial Safety mean?

Industrial safety in the context of occupational safety and health refers to the management of all operations and events within an industry, for protecting its employees and assets by minimizing hazards, risks, accidents and near misses. The relevant laws, compliance and best practices in the industry have most of the issues addressed for the best protection possible. Employers are to make sure that these are strictly adhered to to have maximum safety.

Safeopedia explains Industrial Safety

Industrial safety covers a number of issues and topics affecting safety of personnel and equipment in a particular industry. The following topics are generally discussed:
  • General Safety - General aspects of safety which are common to all
  • Occupational Safety and Health - Particularly associated with the occupation
  • Process and Production Safety - Safety in the process and production etc.
  • Material Safety - Safety of the materials used in the production
  • Workplace Safety - Safety issues directly related to the workplace
  • Fire Safety - Fire safety, in particular the risks associated to the industry
  • Electrical Safety - In general and in particular, arising from the equipment used
  • Building and Structural Safety - Safety in general including installations as per existing building code
  • Environmental Safety - Issues of environmental safety (direct or indirect impact of the industry)

Friday, February 19, 2016

Sawmills improve on wood dust problems

From the Vancouver Sun

Sawmills improve on wood dust problems

Three years after deadly explosions, industry still working to keep employees safe

Sawmills improve on wood dust problems

The Lakeland Mills sawmill in Prince George burned to the ground after a huge explosion in April, 2012.

 

Forest companies appear to have controlled wood dust in their sawmills and pellet plants following deadly explosions in 2012, but WorkSafeBC continues to keep the pressure on to ensure safety.

The province’s chief workplace safety agency began a series of inspections targeting wood dust beginning in 2012 after two explosions at sawmills in northern B.C. that killed four workers and injured dozens of others.

The sixth and latest round of inspections — this one of more than 100 sawmills and more than a dozen pellet plants last year — showed that none were cited for having accumulations of dust considered a risk of fire or explosion, according to more than 1,000 pages of inspection documents obtained by The Vancouver Sun through a freedom of information request.

Previous inspections, including in 2013 and 2014, found dozens of mills had unacceptable wood dust levels.

Despite finding no wood-dust levels considered a risk for explosion in 2015, WorkSafeBC issued six orders calling for improvements to dust-control programs where they believed plants were not being cleaned well enough.

B.C.-based lumber-giant Canfor was issued three such orders at its sawmills in Fort St. John, Vanderhoof and Prince George.

Carrier Lumber in Prince George, Flavelle Sawmill in Port Moody, and Long Hoh Enterprises in Qualicum Beach were also issued similar orders.

Joe Kozek Mills in Revelstoke was issued an order for using pressurized air to clean up dust (considered unsafe because it creates clouds of fine dust) and Teal Cedar in Surrey was cited for not being able to provide information on the design of ventilation equipment used to control dust.

Canfor and Long Hoh Enterprises were issued warning letters and Carrier Lumber was fined $30,000.

Canfor is appealing its orders, and Carrier Lumber is appealing the fine.

“We have communicated to WorkSafe why we feel the orders were not justified and provided documentation to support that,” Canfor spokeswoman Corrine Stavness said in a written statement.

“I think the bigger story here is that the industry and WorkSafe have made a tremendous amount of
progress on managing combustible dust.”

Carrier Lumber president Bill Kordyban said he also thought that significant progress was being made.

“We take it very, very seriously,” said Kordyban, noting the company has added a position dedicated to overseeing wood dust control.

The two mills that exploded in 2012 and since rebuilt with dust control in mind — Babine Forest Products and Lakeland Mills — passed inspections.

WorkSafeBC also found no wood dust issues in inspections at major companies West Fraser, Tolko, Western Forest and Interfor.

Ken Higginbotham, a spokesman for a group of 10 major lumber producers, said audits are used to ensure dust control is being managed properly.

In addition to implementing housekeeping procedures to control dust, companies have spent significant money on dust-control equipment upgrades including new ventilation systems.

West Fraser said it has spent about $50 million. Canfor said it has spent about the same.

“Out of the terrible nature of those two incidents I think there’s a much greater focus on maintaining the dust management, but at the same time looking at safeguarding,” says Higginbotham, a former Canfor executive.

WorkSafeBC vice-president for prevention services Al Johnson agreed there has been significant progress in addressing combustible dust in sawmills, but said where the regulator sees gaps or deficiencies in dust control they order them to be fixed.

    Sawmills improve on wood dust problems

    From The Vancouver Sun

    Sawmills improve on wood dust problems

    Three years after deadly explosions, industry still working to keep employees safe

    Sawmills improve on wood dust problems
    The Lakeland Mills sawmill in Prince George burned to the ground after a huge explosion in April, 2012.

    Forest companies appear to have controlled wood dust in their sawmills and pellet plants following deadly explosions in 2012, but WorkSafeBC continues to keep the pressure on to ensure safety.

    The province’s chief workplace safety agency began a series of inspections targeting wood dust beginning in 2012 after two explosions at sawmills in northern B.C. that killed four workers and injured dozens of others.

    The sixth and latest round of inspections — this one of more than 100 sawmills and more than a dozen pellet plants last year — showed that none were cited for having accumulations of dust considered a risk of fire or explosion, according to more than 1,000 pages of inspection documents obtained by The Vancouver Sun through a freedom of information request.

    Previous inspections, including in 2013 and 2014, found dozens of mills had unacceptable wood dust levels.

    Despite finding no wood-dust levels considered a risk for explosion in 2015, WorkSafeBC issued six orders calling for improvements to dust-control programs where they believed plants were not being cleaned well enough.

    B.C.-based lumber-giant Canfor was issued three such orders at its sawmills in Fort St. John, Vanderhoof and Prince George.

    Carrier Lumber in Prince George, Flavelle Sawmill in Port Moody, and Long Hoh Enterprises in Qualicum Beach were also issued similar orders.

    Joe Kozek Mills in Revelstoke was issued an order for using pressurized air to clean up dust (considered unsafe because it creates clouds of fine dust) and Teal Cedar in Surrey was cited for not being able to provide information on the design of ventilation equipment used to control dust.

    Canfor and Long Hoh Enterprises were issued warning letters and Carrier Lumber was fined $30,000.

    Canfor is appealing its orders, and Carrier Lumber is appealing the fine.

    “We have communicated to WorkSafe why we feel the orders were not justified and provided documentation to support that,” Canfor spokeswoman Corrine Stavness said in a written statement.

    “I think the bigger story here is that the industry and WorkSafe have made a tremendous amount of
    progress on managing combustible dust.”

    Carrier Lumber president Bill Kordyban said he also thought that significant progress was being made.

    “We take it very, very seriously,” said Kordyban, noting the company has added a position dedicated to overseeing wood dust control.

    The two mills that exploded in 2012 and since rebuilt with dust control in mind — Babine Forest Products and Lakeland Mills — passed inspections.

    WorkSafeBC also found no wood dust issues in inspections at major companies West Fraser, Tolko, Western Forest and Interfor.

    Ken Higginbotham, a spokesman for a group of 10 major lumber producers, said audits are used to ensure dust control is being managed properly.

    In addition to implementing housekeeping procedures to control dust, companies have spent significant money on dust-control equipment upgrades including new ventilation systems.

    West Fraser said it has spent about $50 million. Canfor said it has spent about the same.

    “Out of the terrible nature of those two incidents I think there’s a much greater focus on maintaining the dust management, but at the same time looking at safeguarding,” says Higginbotham, a former Canfor executive.

    WorkSafeBC vice-president for prevention services Al Johnson agreed there has been significant progress in addressing combustible dust in sawmills, but said where the regulator sees gaps or deficiencies in dust control they order them to be fixed.
    He said they were particularly concerned that Canfor, a major player in the forest industry in B.C., was having trouble delivering on their dust control plans.

    They brought company executives into a meeting to reiterate the importance of maintaining dust control, he said.

    Johnson said he was aware that Canfor was appealing the orders, noting they had the right to do so. “Combustible dust is a high-risk situation,” said Johnson. “Any health and safety program that addresses combustible dust or respiratory protection or asbestos or whatever the issue may be,
    needs constant vigilance and constant oversight.”

    Johnson said they will transition away from inspection sweeps targeted specifically at wood dust control in 2016, making wood dust monitoring part of routine inspections.

    However, he said mills that were handed orders would likely be inspected by officers specializing in wood dust control at least once more.

    Okanagan Pellet in West Kelowna and Diacarbon Energy in Merritt were cited for using pressurized air to clean dust.

    Rogers Environmental Pellet in Fort St. John was cited for an inadequate dust control program, similar to the orders issued to the sawmills.

    After a poor showing in inspections in 2014, companies have stepped up with a major effort to tackle dust, said Canadian Pellet Association president Gordon Murray.

    They struck a combustible dust committee among plants in B.C., implemented audits, housekeeping procedures and equipment upgrades, said Murray.

    “We work in a hazardous industry and need to be really vigilant,” he said.


    ghoekstra@vancouversun.com

    Monday, February 8, 2016

    Resolute fined after worker burned in dust explosion on wood biomass boiler | Woodworking Network

    From Woodworking Network

    Resolute fined after worker burned in dust explosion on wood biomass boiler







    FORT FRANCES, Ontario
    - Lumber firm Resolute Forest Products Canada Inc., owner of an idled paper mill, pleaded guilty and has been fined $150,000 after a worker was burned following an explosion of wood dust.

    The Ontario Ministry of Labour says the paper mill was idled in 2014 but its bio mass boiler was still in operation to provide heat for the mill through the winter. It was expected that the boiler would be idled after the winter when heating was no longer required.

    The boiler was capable of running on either natural gas or bio mass.
    In 2008 an engineering assessment of the conveyor system for the boiler concluded that the system did not present a dust explosion hazard, owing to the particle size and moisture content of the fuel being used as bio mass.

    In the days before the incident, workers had been doing a cleanup of the plant in anticipation of its closure. Up to 15 wheelbarrow loads of fine, dry wood dust that had been swept up from around the plant were dumped into the conveyor system. At that time, the boiler was running on natural gas.

    On February 27, 2014, it was Resolute's intention to switch the boiler over to bio mass to burn off remaining fuel stock. On that day, a maintenance worker was checking on a plug-up of material in one of the conveyors and was near the operating controls at the head of the conveyor. The worker had cleared the plug-up and was looking into the conveyor to check whether it was going to plug up again.

    As the dry wood dust that had been dumped into the conveyor was travelling on the conveyor, it was ignited by an undetermined source and a dust explosion occurred. A fireball travelled through the conveyor and out the end where the worker was standing. The worker received burns to the body.

    Because the boiler system had not been designed to burn only fine, dry wood dust, but rather fuel with a certain moisture content and particle size, the protective measures of Section 63 of the Regulation for Industrial Establishments dealing with explosive hazards were not in place. That section regulates processes that could create an explosive mixture with air in industrial workplaces.

    The company was fined $150,000 in Fort Frances court by Justice of the Peace Ron Beck on January 29, 2016.


    Friday, January 29, 2016

    U.S. Chemical Safety Board

    U.S. Chemical Safety Board

    CSB - U.S. CHEMICAL SAFETY BOARD -- An independent federal agency investigating chemical accidents to protect workers, the public, and the environment
    U.S. Chemical Safety Board Releases New Safety Video, "Dangerously Close: Explosion in West, Texas,” Detailing Report Findings and Recommendations on 2013 Fatal West Fertilizer Company Explosion and Fire


    January 29, 2016, Washington, DC – Today the U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB) released a safety video into the fatal April 17, 2013, fire and explosion at the West Fertilizer Company in West, Texas, which resulted in 15 fatalities, more than 260 injuries, and widespread community damage. The deadly fire and explosion occurred when about thirty tons of fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (FGAN) exploded after being heated by a fire at the storage and distribution facility.


    The CSB’s newly released 12-minute safety video entitled, “Dangerously Close: Explosion in West, Texas,” includes a 3D animation of the fire and explosion as well as interviews with CSB investigators and Chairperson Vanessa Allen Sutherland. The video can be viewed on the CSB’s website and YouTube.



    Chairperson Sutherland said, “This tragic accident should not have happened. We hope that this video, by sharing lessons learned from our West Fertilizer Company investigation, will help raise awareness of the hazards of fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate so that a similar accident can be avoided in the future.”



    The CSB’s investigation found that several factors contributed to the severity of the explosion, including poor hazard awareness and fact that nearby homes and business were built in close proximity to the West Fertilizer Company over the years prior to the accident. The video explains that there was a stockpile of 40 to 60 tons of ammonium nitrate
    stored at the facility in plywood bins on the night of the explosion. And although FGAN is stable under normal conditions, it can violently detonate when exposed to contaminants in a fire.



    In the video, Team Lead Johnnie Banks says, “We found that as the city of West crept closer and closer to the facility, the surrounding community was not made aware of the serious explosion hazard in their midst. And the West Fertilizer Company underestimated the danger of storing fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate in ordinary combustible structures.”



    The CSB investigation concludes that this lack of awareness was due to several factors, including gaps in federal regulatory coverage of ammonium nitrate storage facilities. The video details safety recommendations made to OSHA and the EPA to strengthen their regulations to protect the public from hazards posed by FGAN.



    Finally, the video explains how inadequate emergency planning contributed to the tragic accident. The CSB found that the West Volunteer Fire Department was not required to perform pre-incident planning for an ammonium nitrate-related emergency, nor were the volunteer firefighters required to attend training on responding to fires involving hazardous chemicals. As a result, the CSB made several safety recommendations to various stakeholders, including the EPA, to
    better inform and train emergency responders on the hazards of FGAN and other hazardous chemicals.



    Chairperson Vanessa Allen Sutherland said, “The CSB’s goal is to ensure that no one else be killed or injured due to a lack of awareness of hazardous chemicals in their communities. If adopted, the Board’s recommendations can help prevent disasters like the one in West, Texas.”



    The CSB is an independent federal agency charged with investigating serious chemical accidents. The agency's board members are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. CSB investigations look into all aspects of chemical accidents, including physical causes such as equipment failure as well as inadequacies in regulations, industry
    standards, and safety management systems. The Board does not issue citations or fines but makes safety  recommendations to companies, industry organizations, labor groups, and regulatory agencies such as OSHA and EPA. Please visit our website, www.csb.gov.



    For more information, contact Communications Manager Hillary Cohen at public@csb.gov or by phone at 202.446.8095.


     
    To forward this to a friend, please click here 

    You are subscribed as: jnichols@industrialfireprevention.com. To unsubscribe this email address, please click here 

     

    CSB 

    2175 K. Street, NW | Washington, DC 20037-1809 

    Phone: (202) 261-7600 | Fax: (202) 261-7650 | www.csb.gov 
     


    Tuesday, January 26, 2016

    It Only Takes a Second . . .

    It takes a minute to write a safety rule.
    It takes an hour to hold a safety meeting.
    It takes a week to plan a good safety program.
    It takes a month to put that program into operation.
    It takes a year to win a safety award.
    It takes a lifetime to make a safe worker.

    But it only takes a second to destroy it all—with one accident.
    Take time NOW to work safely and
    help your fellow employees to be safe.

    One is too many.

    Friday, January 22, 2016

    Over 15,000 NFPA definitions for free! - National Fire Protection Association Blog

    From National Fire Protection Association Blog


    Over 15,000 NFPA definitions for free!

     The 2016 edition of the NFPA Glossary of Terms (GOT) has been published and is available for FREE online. Visit www.nfpa.org/got to download your copy.

    The GOT is a list of the defined terms in all of NFPA's published codes, standards, guides and recommended practices. Over 15,000 terms are listed alphabetically and assembled into a free PDF available on the NFPA website. The document is used in a number of ways. It helps NFPA Technical Committees who are looking to define new terms or compare
    existing terms. It also helps members of the public who are interested in learning about how NFPA documents define specific terms. The GOT contains the following details about each term:

    Term: The word being defined.

    Definition:The description of the term.

    Document (Edition): Where the term and definition are found (document #) and the edition year of that document.

    Document Defining Same Term: A list of all documents that also define the same term.

    Document Using Same Definition: A list of all documents that also define the same term in the exact same way.

    See the figure below for an example of how the GOT is organized. The
    term "Barrel" is defined in 4 documents- NFPA 1, 30, 59A, and 80.  NFPA 1
    and NFPA 30 both define the term in the exact same way. The first 3
    definitions refer to a unit of volume while the last  definition, from
    NFPA 80, refers to a rolling steel door component.To learn more about
    any of the documents defining a term, visit the NFPA Document
    Information pages- www.nfpa.org/(insert doc #). For example, NFPA 80 can
    be found at www.nfpa.org/80.


    Gotpic




    Monday, January 18, 2016

    “It Doesn’t Apply to Me”

    Using Listening to Avoid "Deadly" Resolutions


    Using Listening to Avoid "Deadly" Resolutions

     Jeff Griffin

    Director of Sales & Business Development at Fauske & Associates, LLC

    Using Listening to Avoid "Deadly" Resolutions



    While catching up on my reading from before the holidays, I ran across a short piece in EHS Today,
    which gave a “Top-5 List” of the industries that are most "at risk" for combustible dust explosions. I appreciate these types of articles, and New Year’s lists in general because they are good for raising awareness about important topics and motivating change. As someone in the safety industry, I am most interested in those lists that address the risks found in industry, whether with combustible dust, flammability, orthermal hazards.


    “It Doesn’t Apply to Me”

    The danger with looking at anyone else's list is that it is easy to take a quick look and infer that the list “does not apply to me”. This happens a lot when dealing with process safety. I have found this to be particularly true of people who are dealing with combustible dusts. Many people assume that only certain industries have ‘real’ problem with their dust. Unfortunately, that is just not the case. In fact, the new NFPA 652 Standard on the Fundamentals of Combustible Dust was authored to prevent omissions from occurring when it comes to safe practices with dust.

    The reason for this is that formerly, many industries had separate standards governing the risks associated with their dusts. For example, there are standards for agricultural and food companies (NFPA 61), for metals (NFPA 484) and woodworking facilities (NFPA 664).  The diversity of standards made it easy for non-experts to be confused about what the correct approach to hazard mitigation should be.

    While there are certainly key differences across industries, the consolidated standard (NFPA 652) reinforces that there are certain best practices to be considered by all companies regardless of the industry or the material being handled. Best practices include testing the specific dust at your facility (even if  published values exist that are ‘close’ to the material at your facility), AND conducting a Dust Hazard Assessment (DHA) to ensure that risks are appropriately addressed.


    Avoiding Deadly Resolutions

    The example given here focuses on combustible dust, but the principle is true across industries. There are ample best practices found on industry and governmental websites, and there plenty of experts willing to chime in.

    As we make our task lists to kick off the new year, let’s make the prevention of severe accidents in ALL industries the first line item on our lists.




    Friday, January 15, 2016

    OSHA's Top 10 List

    OSHA's Top 10 most cited violations for fiscal year 2015 | December 2015 | Safety+Health Magazine

    OSHA's Top 10 most cited violations

    Growing data and changing inspection strategies

    November 22, 2015


    The Top 10 list of OSHA’s most-frequently cited violations for fiscal year 2015 may look similar
    to last year’s, but change is happening behind the scenes.

    One year ago, OSHA began collecting additional data from employers on amputations and hospitalizations; the resulting information has led to the agency “engaging with every employer” involved in the reported incidents, Patrick Kapust, deputy director of OSHA’s Directorate of
    Enforcement Activities, said in an exclusive interview with Safety+Health.

    In September, OSHA announced it will move away from tallying each inspection equally and instead will use a weighted system based on how complicated the inspection may be. The new system is intended to place greater value on complex inspections and allow for easier strategic planning on OSHA’s part.

    Additionally, the agency is continuing other efforts – including focused inspections across the country – to mitigate high-hazard threats, such as those related to ergonomics and working at height.
    Employers who want to avoid being cited for one of the “Top 10” violations need to be proactive.

    “We continue to encourage employers to abate hazards before an OSHA inspection and, more importantly, before a worker gets hurt,” Kapust told S+H.


    Most-cited violations, fiscal year 2015
    Data current as of Oct. 8, 2015

    Thursday, January 14, 2016

    Which Industries are at Risk for Combustible Dust Explosions?

    From EHS Today

    What Are the Industries at Risk for Combustible Dust Explosions?

    FR clothing company Workrite Uniform Co. encourages workplace safety by highlighting the top five at-risk industries.
    Thinkstock

    Combustible dust, accumulated particulate solids with the potential to ignite and create a flash fire hazard, is a present danger for a number of industries. However, workers can reduce burn injury with the use of flame-resistant (FR) clothing.

    Personal protective equipment manufacturers are the “go-to” experts in the use of PPE: Their representatives serve on ANSI, NFPA and ASTM committees and much of the research and development and testing of PPE is done by manufacturers.

    According to Workrite Uniform Co., employers need to ensure that FR clothing is UL-certified
    to NFPA 2112, the “Standard on Flame-Resistant Garments for Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire.”

    Workrite created a “Top 5” list of industries that face the highest risk of combustible dust explosions to generate awareness among employers and workers.

    Food Production
    - Many agricultural products – such as sugar, grains, egg whites and even powdered milk – carry a risk of combustion under the right conditions. Workers in the agricultural industry should be aware of the inherent risk of handling, transporting and storing these products.

    Synthetic Manufacturing
    – Materials that are common in synthetic manufacturing – including rubber, plastics and other man-made substances – can create combustible dust clouds with the potential to ignite.

    Woodworking
    – Frequently cutting, grinding, sanding and polishing wood can generate a significant amount of sawdust, which is able to easily combust in certain conditions such as being ignited by a spark from a nearby machine.

    Metal Processing
    – Dust from metals like aluminum, chromium, iron, magnesium and zinc is combustible, and many of the activities in a metal processing environment can produce heat and sparks.

    Recycling Facilities
    – Recycling facilities handle a wide variety of materials, and the sorting, processing, handling and transporting of these materials increases the risk of explosions caused by combustible dust.

    To help combat the heightened risk of combustible dust explosions, it is important for workplaces to perform risk assessments, keep work areas clean, conduct regular inspections and ensure that employees wear the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE).

    For detailed information, review NFPA 654, which is the industry standard that provides the safety measures to prevent and mitigate fires and dust explosions in facilities that handle combustible particulate solids.

    For more information on combustible dust and other safety hazards, industry standards and the role of FR clothing in workplace safety,visit www.frinformation.com.

    Wednesday, December 16, 2015

    Cal Ripken, Jr. gives tips to help prevent workplace fires and ensure the safety of your workers

    ISHN 2015 Article Video Player



    On an average day in America, there are over 200 workplace fires causing hundreds of fatalities and thousands more injuries. In this video Cal Ripken, Jr. gives you some tips to help you prevent workplace fires and ensure the safety of your workers. Brought to you by Northern Safety, which offers a full line of safety and industrial products.



    Here:
    ISHN 2015 Article Video Player

    Portable fire extinguisher basics

    From Northern Safety News & Information - Northern Safety Co., Inc.

    Portable fire extinguisher basics
    Fires can be dangerous and costly, and a portable fire extinguisher can be an effective tool to help control or put out early-stage fires.



    Fire extinguishers are classified by the type of fire they will extinguish and include:


    Class A: Water, used for fires involving ordinary combustibles such as paper, cloth, wood, rubber, and many plastics

    Class B: CO2, used for fires involving flammable liquids such as oils, gas, some paints, lacquers, grease, and solvents

    Class C: Dry chemical, used for fires involving electrical
    equipment such as wiring, fuse boxes, energized electrical machinery,
    computers, or other electrical items

    Class ABC: Multi-purpose, can be used for most fires involving ordinary combustibles, flammable liquids, or electrical equipment

    Class D: Used for fires involving powders, flakes, or shavings of metals such as magnesium, titanium, potassium, and sodium

    Class K:Used for fires involving cooking fluids such as oils and fats


    Most handheld fire extinguishers use the P.A.S.S. technique to operate:

    • Pull the pin. This will prepare the extinguisher for use and break the tamper seal.
    • Aim the extinguisher nozzle low, at the base of the fire
    • Squeeze the handle to release extinguishing materials
    • Sweep the nozzle back and forth at the base of the fire until it appears to be out. Then watch. Repeat the process if the fire begins to flame back up


    Take time to develop an emergency action plan for fire safety. With the proper planning, fire safety equipment, and training, companies can help protect workers and property.



    Tuesday, December 1, 2015

    New free Post-Blast Response training video from the Firefighters Support Foundation - Industrial Fire Journal - Fire & Rescue - Hemming Group Ltd

    From Hemming Group Ltd

    New free Post-Blast Response training video from the Firefighters Support Foundation

    Published:  25 November, 2015

    The Firefighters Support Foundation’s (FSF) newest training program, Post-Blast Response is now available free of charge.

    Presented by August Vernon, an emergency management subject matter expert, the 32-minute video accompanies a 47-slide PowerPoint presentation. The video explains why post-blast response is an important subject for firefighters, EMTs, search and rescue, and other emergency management  personnel.  It describes the actions and tactics to be employed immediately after the blast is called in, while arriving on scene, during the first critical minutes, and throughout what will certainly be a  lengthy investigation.

    ‘This program also describes ways in which various the public safety agencies need to work together and describes critical elements of the ICS system that will play a key role,’ said FSF President David
    Kenik.

    The PowerPoint resource can be used by any agency or member either as is or as a basis from which to construct training modules or presentations. Download your copy from www.ffsupport.org