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Thursday, May 29, 2014

Industrial emergencies - be prepared - Industrial Fire Journal - Fire & Rescue - Hemming Group Ltd

Industrial emergencies - be prepared

From Industrial Fire Journal - Fire & Rescue - Hemming Group Ltd and www.hemmingfire.com

Industrial emergencies - be prepared

Published:  28 May, 2014
Where does crisis management go wrong?

Kees Kappetijn, an independent consultant in the field of emergency and crisis management, outlines the problem and the solution.

Disasters do not start on Tuesday at 10.00 a.m. when the weather is sunny and all personnel and staff are available.

Neither is fighting a crisis the primary goal for a business. And crisis management is not ‘regular management’ with some additional time stress factored in.

Considering this, it is remarkable that many organisations (often with enormous business interests in terms of money, liability and brand name) do not focus on the link between emergency management leadership and the crisis management team. This connecting link is crucial for the development and impact of an incident.

This link goes under many names - the on-scene commander, the incident manager, the calamity coordinator or senior shift supervisor.

In the Netherlands this person is called the ‘company representative’ (‘bedrijfsdeskundige’). For hazardous industry it is often a formal position within the emergency response organisation, dictated by the law that regulates the dimensions of the company fire brigade. Although this position has existed for some 20 years, the basic education for managers that have had to perform this duty has not been available. Until now.

Crisis management design

The design of a basic emergency response and crisis management organisation is based on four levels:

· Level 1: Basic emergency response units (occupational health
and safety officers, firefighters, security members, dispatch team,
technical facilitators and logistics providers)

· Level 2: Leadership of emergency response teams

· Level 3: Command and control over the leadership

· Level 4: Crisis management.

Within this concept the various levels are also connected to the public emergency services; fire brigade, ambulance services, police, emergency room etc and follow the same levelling.

Level 1: basic performance, level 2: team leaders, level 3: coordinating officers and level 4: crisis staffing of the mayor or governor. For an appropriate connection, consider this process as a zipper: if the teeth don’t fit together you will not get ahead as the scenario develops and therefore will be unable to direct the scenario.

When outlining the roles of the teams and units the level of knowledge, skills and competences required must be clearly defined.

This must be based on the risk profile of the organisation and the existing safety provisions. The structure for emergency response and various emergency response units may be the same, but the tasks, vehicles, equipment, PPE etc will differ enormously for instance between a refinery, a starch manufacturer, a pharmaceutical company and a nuclear facility.

Special consideration is needed for the fact that, in most companies, the positions in the emergency management structures are combined positions.

Operators may perform dual roles as occupational health and safety officers or fire fighters, shift leaders as fire fighting team leaders, security employees as dispatch centre operators. The same may applies to the level 3 position, where the manager or senior person has to fulfill the additional role of company representative. And while most companies are prepared to invest heavily in the purchase of equipment and education and training for levels 1 and 2, the level 3 position is (mistakenly) often regarded as self-teaching.

The five basic points of awareness:

1. The start

Organisations train their crisis management (levels 3 & 4) on Tuesday, with good weather and all personnel available. Alarm at 10.00, level 1 and 2 teams available at 10.06, alarm for level 3 at 10.10,
available at 10.15, and crisis management team available at 10.20. What are the dilemmas for the company representative? What are the dilemmas for the crisis management team?

Take the same scenario, with the same storyline, and this time position it at Christmas Eve, 01.15 hours and alarm the company representative after 45 minutes. A temperature of-2˚C with rain, ice on
the roads. Half the population on holiday, the other half in church or in bed. The response time for the company representative is 30 minutes after alarm, for the crisis management team 60 minutes after alarm.

Make the company representative aware of this difference and educate him for the worst.

2. What to fight for?

For public emergency services fighting and emergency is a goal in itself. The emergency represents a distrubance in society and the target is to restore normality. Private organisations have other goals:
restore business continuity, secure the corporate image and brand name, reduce financial losses, minimise the chances of liability for the company and its individuals with key-responsibilities. Regularly this is the starting point of the awareness and actions of the company representative.

3. Position in chain of command

The handling of larger incidents that escalate in an uncontrolled way with effects outside the company surroundings and with the potential to threaten environment and lives of many, often begin with in-situ resources and in-house emergency response units. As soon as public aid services assist they take over the leadership over the incident.

It is important for the company representative to be aware of his position in relation to the public aid services. For the company, he has the mandate to take every decision necessary, but for the public aid
services he has an advisory role in suppression tactics.

4. Crisis manager vs regular manager

Managers are generally responsible for a part of an organisation in terms of results, quality, time and the appliance of people, facilities and money. A business manager is not automatically fit to be a good crisis manager.

The starting point, the situation where decisions must be made, the stakes and the stress levels are all different, which is why appropriate preparation and education are crucial.

5. Preparation and improvisation

Preparation of crisis management requires room for improvisation. We tend to prepare for what we know and have previously experienced. Having accepted that, it is necessary to define the areas in our plans where we can improvise during a crisis. However it must be noted that organised, staged improvisation is very different to improvisationg during an event and environment that hasn’t been experienced before.

Preparation for the company representative: program

The company representative is the key for a company in case of a large incident. His actions and decisions influence the duration of discontinuity, the long term impact to the environment, the corporate image, the way media report about the crisis and the extent to which leadership of public aid services listen to input during incident management. The manager in this position has to be skilled properly, starting with a basic education, followed by ongoing and frequent training.



At a basic level, every organisation that has to comply with Seveso regulations (comparable:

COMAH-legislation) must have a company representative in some form: either available by phone or on site, through a duty-roster with a 15 minute response time.

Regardless of the organisational background of a company, the basic education programme for the company representative should lead to the following goals:
  • Awareness of legislation, guidelines and policies;
  • Awareness of the set up of emergency response, crisis management and business continuity;
  • Ability to work with threat analysis, business impact analysis, credible, normative and disaster scenarios;
  • Awareness of the set up of public emergency and crisis management structures and procedures;
  • Familiarisation of decision making with public officers;
  • Ability to determine company interests during a crisis;
  • Liaison with the company’s crisis management team (and getting them in position).
Following modern standards a program has to lead to a certificate that bears an independent quality stamp, such as JOIFF certification, which indicates the quality and content of a program, the expertise and background of the instructors, the used facilities and the way the education is structurally secured at a high level.

Good education can mean the difference between restorable and non-restorable business continuity.


About the author



Kees Kappetijn is an independent consultant in the field of emergency and crisis management (www.keeskappetijn.nl).

He supports organisations in the public and private domain that have to prepare for larger incidents and crises. He is board member of Joiff,the international association for industrial hazard management.

This article will be published in the Summer 2014 edition of Industrial Fire Journal.

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Fire detection: challenges and solutions - Industrial Fire Journal - Fire & Rescue - Hemming Group Ltd

Industrial Fire detection: challenges and solutions

From Industrial Fire Journal - Fire & Rescue - Hemming Group Ltd and www.HemmingFire.com

Fire detection: challenges and solutions


Published:  28 May, 2014
Fred Hildebrandt of Janus Fire Detection tackles the thorny subject of choosing the correct detection technology for protecting industrial facilities.


Fire alarm control panels and accessories have improved dramatically in design, reliability, flexibility and price. The vast majority of systems supplied throughout the world are installed in the residential and commercial markets. Therefore, the panels and accessories are tailored to those markets, locations such as hospitals,schools, and office buildings. When systems are designed for the
industrial market, numerous environmental challenges are encountered that are not present in residential or commercial markets
. A brief discussion of those challenges and solutions follow.

Enclosures

Standard enclosures must balance aesthetics with accessibility. They are typically rated NEMA 1/IP 10, which is well suited for an office complex but is totally inappropriate for a metals processing facility. Some manufacturers offer enclosures rated to withstand industrial environments but the vast majority leave that up to the designer/installer. When choosing an enclosure it is therefore important to consider the following:

1. Area Classification: Does the possibilityof explosive vapours or dusts exist? If so, the enclosure may require pressurization or an explosive rating.

2. Temperature: Will temperature conditioning be required to either heat or cool the electronics mounted within the enclosure? Check the manufacturers’ data sheets to ensure the expected
temperature does not exceed its recommended operating parameters.

3. Venting: Most batteries require free air venting to avoid the possibility of gas build up while they are being charged.

4. Material of Construction: Weather resistant enclosures fabricated from mild steel coated with protective paint finish may be the best choice to preclude ingress of dust and moisture but if the unit is placed in a corrosive environment close to a body of water or in a facility such as a water treatment or sewage plant, more corrosion resistant materials such as stainless steel or fiberglass may be the most logical choice.

5. Access: While it is important to house the panel properly, accessibility to respond to an alarm, acknowledge trouble or fault conditions, reset or silence an alarm condition must be maintained. Window kits which maintain the integrity of the panel can serve to ensure compliance with this aspect of the design. Ingress protected switches can be mounted to the enclosure or in a separate
junction box located adjacent to the enclosure.

Power

Main feed to the control panel in an industrial setting may be problematic. The quality of power may not be to the levels anticipated by the fire alarm control panel manufacturer. Unanticipated voltage dips may be experienced when large motors are energized. Frequencies generated by electronic motor controllers have caused trouble conditions. Where multiple buildings are protected, the potential
difference in the ground plane may create problems for ground fault circuitry.

Some of these situations can be avoided by adding isolation transformers to the incoming power feed. Ground faults can be reduced by checking the ground potential when different buildings are added to the control panel. Surge suppressors can help reduce the destructive potential of lightning strikes and other unplanned environmental conditions.

Connection Between Structures

Most modern control panels allow the communications link or SLC loop to be installed utilizing copper conductors or fiber optic cable. Connections between buildings (especially those elevated in open air) are prone to damage by adverse environmental conditions especially from lightning strikes. Surge suppressors help minimize damage. Fiber optic cable may offer an alternative to copper and reduce the likelihood of damage to the communication loop.

Control Panel

In most cases the flexibility of addressable control panels makes them the logical choice for use in the industrial sector. Programming features are very robust and tractable and addressable panels have the capability to pinpoint the location of a device in trouble or alarm. In the industrial sector clients are typically very familiar with Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) and may not understand the limitations of Fire Alarm panels and ask why they are not as flexible as the PLC’s used to operate their plants. Fire alarm control panels are designed and configured to meet operating parameters established by international approving authorities, fire officials, code making bodies and local governmental agencies. The environment in which the main controller is installed may be reasonably
controlled; locating field modules and associated devices can be more problematic.





Addressable Devices


Typically when discussing devices associated with addressable control panels we immediately think of smoke or heat detectors. All manufacturers also offer modules to address dry contact and current
limiting devices such as flow, tamper and pressure switches, conventional heat detectors, call points, etc.  As devices are deployed throughout the facility it is of utmost importance to ensure that those devices are installed within their environmental range.

The temperature range of addressable modules must be considered during design and installation. Each manufacturer publishes the temperature range for their devices; if they are installed in areas that exceed those parameters, the device may fail prematurely or cause sporadic trouble conditions.
Installing these devices near ovens, furnaces, or where they may be impinged upon in a fire condition may result in temperatures exceeding the design parameters of the device, causing potential problems. A better choice would be to locate them in a conditioned space as close to the device being monitored as possible.

Alarm and Signaling

Industrial facilities can run the gamut from high tech streamlined manufacturers of automotive or aerospace products to foundries. All have many similarities: the processing areas are noisy and usually have quite a bit of traffic moving through crowded aisles ranging from fork lifts to automatic guided vehicles. Emergency override switches are strategically placed and flashing indicator lights are the norm. This makes selection and placement of call points and signaling devices a challenge. Typically, placement of these devices is mandated by local codes and standards. Thought must be given to the style, type and location of call points and signaling devices. They must be both accessible and easily identifiable in an emergency situation. They must give clear notice of a fire condition along with indicating a path of safe egress.



Not only must the device be more durable in an industrial setting, it also must meet any electrical or flammability ratings for the area in which it is installed. Explosive atmospheres require unique devices that normally require much more power than a standard audible-visual indicator. Strobe candela and horn decibel ratings most likely will have to be at the high end of the available range. In
certain areas additional devices or high output units must be used. This increases the load on power supplies and associated battery backup.

Wire size will need to be increased to support higher current requirements. All of this adds to the cost and complexity of the installation.

Detection

Selection of detection devices can be quite a challenge in an industrial setting. The vast majority of systems designed for the commercial setting rely on smoke and heat. When working in industrial
occupancies it most likely will be necessary to expand our knowledge base to a wider array of device and sensor technologies. A very brief synopsis of some widely used devices follows:

1. Linear heat detectors are widely used to protect cable trays, conveyors, and rack storage to name but a few suitable locations.

2. Air aspirated smoke detection technology has advanced beyond the traditional clean high air flow environments to protect hazards once thought to be environmentally unacceptable for such early
warning technology. Fitted with appropriate filters, the current generation of air sampling detectors has the capability to discriminate between particulate matter generated by the combustion process and
larger particle dusts which can be a by-product of many industrial processes. One manufacturer has added gas detection capabilities to their detector sampling networks allowing one sampling network to perform multiple functions.

3. Fixed gas detection is used in process facilities, tank farms, truck and rail car loading racks, and numerous other locations.

Normally wiring methods and devices in these facilities are electrically rated as flammable or explosion proof. Current technology relies upon infrared or catalytic bead sensors interconnected to or integrated with transmitters using relay contacts or 4-20 MA outputs. Sensor choice and
location are key to ensuring reliability and improving sensor life.

4. Flame detection offers rapid response to open burning from the smallest to large fires. Specialized detectors are used where hard to see fuels like hydrogen flames and non-carbon based materials are
processed or stored. Detectors are offered in traditional ultraviolet and infrared spectrum as well as multi-spectrum devices to target specific materials. Video fire detection offers the added benefit of
being able to stream video of the protected area.

Extinguishing System

Fire extinguishing and suppression systems must be considered in the design and supply of the Fire Alarm system. Monitoring of traditional fire sprinklers does not present major challenges to most
control panel designs, but nuances associated with Clean Agent, CO2, Foam, Dry Chemical, Explosion Suppression and other systems encountered in the industrial sector may be a challenge to the panel designer and may be best addressed utilizing control panels specifically configured for that application. Normally volt free contacts are available to indicate trouble and alarm conditions and should be interfaced with the system.

Conclusion

Industrial applications present unique challenges for fire alarm control panels, but the technologies to address these challenges are available.

The right combination of panel and accessories exists. It is only necessary to understand the nature of these challenges by considering each concern as outlined above in order to find the solution that fits
the specific environmental, logistical and price constraints imposed by the individual application. Working with the right supplier who will take all these factors into consideration will make a potentially complex process both straightforward and successful.

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Reducing the Risk of Dust Explosions by Controlling Electrical Ignition Sources Webinar

Webinars/Online Events from our friends at Powder/Bulk Solids

Webinars On-Demand:

 

- DryPro 2014 Webcast Series - Reducing the Risk of Dust Explosions by Controlling Electrical Ignition Sources

- When: April 3, 2014 11 am (PDT)/ 2 pm EDT To attend this event or to find out more information, please visit this page.

- This webinar is moderated by Powder & Bulk Solids Editor-in-Chief Kevin Cronin.

- Justin Bishop, Ph.D., P.E., CFEI, managing engineer with Exponent
Failure Analysis Associates will talk about how dust explosions are a
potential hazard in bulk solid manufacturing and process facilities.
Electrical ignition sources are routinely identified as a possible cause
during dust explosion investigations. Attend this webinar to learn
about:

Selecting the correct electrical equipment for dusty environments,
and why the installation of the equipment must be directed by the
manufacturer.

Applicable national codes and standards information you need for guidance when selecting electrical equipment.

Real world examples of appropriate and inappropriate electrical equipment installations.


- DryPro 2013 Webcast Series - Important Tips for Selecting a Belt, Screw, or Bucket Elevator Conveyor

- View the archived event here to view this free webinar.

- This webinar was moderated by Powder & Bulk Solids Editor-in-Chief Kevin Cronin.

- Jenike & Johanson CEO Herman Purutyan will speak in the latest
of the Powder & Bulk Solids DryPro webinar series. Mechanical
conveyors are used in many industries—mining, minerals, chemicals,
powder, plastics, and food—to transport powders and bulk solids. Belt,
screw, and bucket elevator conveyors are routinely used to move
materials, while providing high throughput and elevation capabilities.
Attend this free webcast to learn about: Belt, screw, and bucket
elevator conveyor features plus examples of conveying applications;
Conveyor system components; Typical conveyor operational capacities;
Important bulk solids properties required for conveyor selection; We
will also examine general capabilities for each conveyor and present a
side-by-side comparison that can help you decide the right system for
your operation.


- DryPro 2013 Webcast Series - A Simple Approach to Preventing and Mitigating Dust Explosions

- View the archived event here to view this free webinar.

- This webinar was moderated by Powder & Bulk Solids Editor-in-Chief Kevin Cronin.

- Ashok Ghose Dastidar, PhD MBA Vice President, Dust &
Flammability Testing and Consulting Services, Fauske & Associates
LLC discusses measures to reduce the risks of dust explosions, including
effective housekeeping, equipment protection, and electrical area
classification. He also discusses recent incidents investigated by the
US Chemical Safety Board that resulted in government and industry doing
more to mitigate the hazard of dust explosions to protect American
workers as well as a simple methodological approach to tackle the
problem of combustible dust hazard. A Q&A period followed his
discussion.





Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Combustible Dust Basics: How to Collect a Sample and What Does a Go/No-Go Test Mean?

Combustible Dust Basics:
  • How to Collect a Sample
  • What Does a Go/No-Go Test Mean?

This CSB photo shows the aftermatch of the dust explosion and fire on Feb. 20, 2003, at the CTA Acoustics manufacturing plant in Corbin, Ky. killing seven workers.

Combustible Dust Basics: How to Collect a Sample and What Does a Go/No-Go Test Mean?

We've been blogging and writing a lot recently on the basics of combustible dust. Makes sense; after all, what safety professionalknows exactly how much of their particular dust, in their particular
facility, under a certain set of circumstances is OK? And if you don'tyet have a dust collection system, how do you know what you need? Evenif you have a collector, do you have the proper Process Hazards Analysis (PHA) to understand your dust’s potential for explosibility?

Plant and facility safety professional customers often will call and say they think they need a dust test but do not know what the next stepis. They'll ask, "How do I collect a sample?" "What is a Go/No-Go test?"

While we offer a list of testing services to determine the deflagration hazards of dust samples per ASTM International, OSHA,National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), and UN (United Nations), knowing the basic tests can go a long way for tackling your safety needs.


In Professor Paul Amyotte's "An Introduction to Dust Explosions:
Understanding the Myths and Realities of Dust Explosions For a Safer Workplace," Amyotte offers a section on Practical Guidance:

These observations help to explain the advice given by experienced industrial practitioners on the matter of acceptable combustible dust layer thicknesses. Their comments, although anecdotal, have a firm foundation in the physics and chemistry of dust explosions. Scientific underpinning by the aforementioned difficulties in physically dispersing and chemically reacting excessively thick dust deposits is intrinsic to the following expressions:
  • There's too much layered dust if you can see your initials written in the dust.
  • There's too much layered dust if you can see your footprints in
    the dust (Anonymous, 1996. Personal communication, with permission).
  • There's too much dust if you can’t tell the color of the surface
    beneath the layer (Freeman, R., 2010. Personal communication, with
    permission).
  • I tell my plant manager to write their name on their business
    card. It's time to clean up when they can’t read their name because of
    layered dust. (Anonymous, 2012. Personal communication, with
    permission).
So, what is a combustible dust? You might be wondering this before you worry about how to ship it off to be tested. Per the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety: Essentially, a combustible dust isany fine material that has the ability to catch fire and explode when mixed with air. Combustible dusts can be from:
  • most solid organic materials (such as sugar, flour, grain, wood, etc.)
  • many metals, and
  • some nonmetallic inorganic materials.
Some of these materials are not "normally" combustible, but they can burn or explode if the particles are the right size and in the right concentration.


Therefore, any activity that creates dust should be investigated to see whether there is a risk of that dust being combustible. Dust can collect on surfaces such as rafters, roofs, suspended ceilings, ducts,
crevices, dust collectors, and other equipment. When the dust is disturbed and under certain circumstances, there is the potential for a serious explosion to occur. The buildup of even a very small amount of dust can cause serious damage.


OSHA defines combustible dust as "a solid material composed of distinct particles or pieces, regardless of size, shape, or chemical composition, which presents a fire or deflagration hazard when suspended in air or some other oxidizing medium over a range of concentrations."


Which Workplaces Are at Risk for a Dust Explosion?

Dust explosions have occurred in many different types of workplaces and industries, including:
  • Grain elevators
  • Food production
  • Chemical manufacturing (e.g., rubber, plastics, pharmaceuticals)
  • Woodworking facilities
  • Metal processing (e.g., zinc, magnesium, aluminum, iron)
  • Recycling facilities (e.g., paper, plastics, metals)
  • Coal-fired power plants
Dusts are created when materials are transported, handled, processed, polished, ground, and shaped. Dusts are also created by abrasive blasting, cutting, crushing, mixing, sifting, or screening dry
materials. The buildup of dried residue from the processing of wet materials also can generate dusts. Essentially, any workplace that generates dust is potentially at risk.


So, do you have something that might be hazardous in your facility? You need a simple test to find out whether it's explosible. That's a "Go/No-Go Test." Collect a dust sample and find out if and what it takes to ignite. Air sampling is not necessary to determine whether or not a dust is combustible.


Dust testing is performed on the sample as it is received ("as received") from your facility. It may be screened to less than 420 µm (40 mesh)--OSHA's and NFPA's demarcation of a "dust"--to facilitate
dispersion into a dust cloud. Particle size may vary widely, depending on the sample.


It's easier than you think:


This graphic shows how to collect and ship a dust sample for testing. (Fauske graphic)


* Please note: If you suspect you may have an
electrostatically charged dust, collect the sample by using a
plastic-coated shovel or scoop.



A Go/No-Go Screening Test, based on ASTM E1226, "Standard Test Method
for Explosibility of Dust Clouds," is an abbreviated, set explosion severity testing at two or more dust concentrations to determine whether
the sample is explosible. This test is generally performed with samples
tested "as received" or sieved with more than 100 grams (approximately
0.25 pounds) of sample less than 420 µm required.

A Combustible Dust Screening Test is based on VDI2263 and UN 4.1 combustion testing. This test is to determine whether a dust in a pile supports self-sustaining flame propagation. [More than 30 grams
(approximately 1 ounce) of sample less than 420µm required; more than 300 grams (approximately 0.67 pounds) of sample less than 420 µmrequired if testing metal dusts.]


This Fauske graphic is a flow chart of the go/no go tests for potentially combustible dusts.


This chart discusses the outcomes for your tested dust. If your test sample is a "Yes, it explodes," then further tests can be run to determine how quickly and how severe the explosion will be (KSt/Pmax Test), followed by testing what concentration of dust in the air will cause a
risk of explosion (MEC Test). Next, another test can determine whether a spark will cause an explosion (MIE Test).


But what if your Go/No-Go test result is a "no"? We next look at what temperature it will take make your dust ignite. To find the Minimum Autoignition Temperature (MIT) of a dust cloud in the air, the MIT tests the minimum temperature that would cause your dust cloud to ignite.

Next is the Layer Ignition Test (LIT), which determines the hot-surface ignition temperature of a dust layer. Finally, a VDI 2263 burning behavior test is conducted to determine whether a dust will burn and, if it does, how quickly it will spread. It is followed up by a UN 4.1 Burn Rate test for additional confirmation.

All of these tests start with the Go/No-Go Test. A comprehensive Process Hazards Analysis (PHA) can apply your test results to real-world scenarios at your facility. Better to know what you are dealing with so you can plan safely!


Here are some other tests run for dust explosibility screening:

  • Go/No-Go Screening + Combustible Dust Screening Package. Both tests run in tandem as a screening package.
  • Sample Characterization Test. It includes determining the sample
    moisture content and particle size distribution (more than30 grams of
    sample less than 420 µm required).
  • "Hard-to-ignite" Explosibility Test. Tested as above, but with a
    400 J ignition source [more than100 grams (approximately 0.25 pounds)
    of sample less than 420 µm required]
Unless otherwise instructed, dust testing is performed on the sample as it is received ("as received") from your facility, as mentioned earlier. It may be screened to less than 420 µm (40 mesh)--OSHA's and NFPA's demarcation of a "dust"--to facilitate dispersion into a dust cloud. Particle size may vary widely, depending on the sample.

Furthermore, note that, per ASTM recommendations (and some NPFA requirements), samples should be tested at a particle size less than 75 µm and less than 5 percent moisture. Please note that testing materials in a method not complying with the ASTM/EU recommendations may produce explosion severity and explosion sensitivity data that is not considered conservative enough for explosion mitigation design.


About the Author

AnnMarie Fauske, MBA, is the Marketing Manager of Fauske & Associates, LLC (www.fauske.com). She wrote this article with assistance from Ashok Dastidar, Ph.D., MBA, Vice President, Dust & Flammability Testing and Consulting Services for Fauske &
Associates. For more information on your dust testing questions or needs, contact Jeff Griffin at griffin@fauske.com or 630-887-5278.



Copyright 1996-2013 1105 Media Inc. All rights reserved.



Monday, May 5, 2014

The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America appoints Jamison Scott as new president


From www.lesprom.com/en/news
 
Congratulations to our friend Jamie Scott at Air Handling Systems on his appointment as president to the WMMA.

The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America appoints Jamison Scott as new president

1 May, 14:57
May 02, 2014. /Lesprom Network/. The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America (WMMA) appoints Jamison Scott as new president, as WMMA said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. 
Jamison has presented several combustible dust seminars and regularly acts as a technical resource. He has authored several combustible dust articles for national and international trade publications including Air Pollution Control, Wood & Wood Products, CabinetMakerFDM, Wood Industry (Canada), Woodshop News, Chemical Engineering, and FDM Asia. Scott also serves on the Technical Advisory Board for Air Pollution Control, a technical trade publication, and chairs the Industrial Dust Task Force for WMMA. He also sits on the board of the New Haven Manufacturers Association (NHMA), and is a member of the Town of Woodbridge, CT Economic Development Commission.

"Jamie Scott is going to make an excellent leader for this association," stated John Schultz, WMMA's outgoing president. "He has served WMMA and the industry at large on numerous levels, and is well prepared for the challenges of this position."

WMMA, the Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America, is a nonprofit organization that develops and publishes standards guiding the proper manufacturing of woodworking equipment. WMMA standards are prevalent within the United States, used and contributed to by its over 150 member companies.
- See more at: http://www.lesprom.com/en/news/The_Wood_Machinery_Manufacturers_of_America_appoints_Jamison_Scott_as_new_president_61767/#sthash.KGcBnC8k.dpuf

The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America appoints Jamison Scott as new president

1 May, 14:57
May 02, 2014. /Lesprom Network/. The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America (WMMA) appoints Jamison Scott as new president, as WMMA said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. 
Jamison has presented several combustible dust seminars and regularly acts as a technical resource. He has authored several combustible dust articles for national and international trade publications including Air Pollution Control, Wood & Wood Products, CabinetMakerFDM, Wood Industry (Canada), Woodshop News, Chemical Engineering, and FDM Asia. Scott also serves on the Technical Advisory Board for Air Pollution Control, a technical trade publication, and chairs the Industrial Dust Task Force for WMMA. He also sits on the board of the New Haven Manufacturers Association (NHMA), and is a member of the Town of Woodbridge, CT Economic Development Commission.

"Jamie Scott is going to make an excellent leader for this association," stated John Schultz, WMMA's outgoing president. "He has served WMMA and the industry at large on numerous levels, and is well prepared for the challenges of this position."

WMMA, the Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America, is a nonprofit organization that develops and publishes standards guiding the proper manufacturing of woodworking equipment. WMMA standards are prevalent within the United States, used and contributed to by its over 150 member companies.
- See more at: http://www.lesprom.com/en/news/The_Wood_Machinery_Manufacturers_of_America_appoints_Jamison_Scott_as_new_president_61767/#sthash.KGcBnC8k.dpuf


The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America appoints Jamison Scott as new president

1 May, 14:57

May 02, 2014. /Lesprom Network/. TheWood Machinery Manufacturers of America (WMMA) appoints Jamison Scott as new president, as WMMA said in the press release received by Lesprom Network.  

Jamison has presented several combustible dust seminars and regularly acts as a technical resource. He has authored several combustible dust articles for national and international trade publications including Air Pollution Control, Wood & Wood Products, CabinetMakerFDM, Wood Industry (Canada), Woodshop News, Chemical Engineering, and FDM Asia. Scott also serves on the Technical Advisory Board for Air Pollution Control, a technical trade publication, and chairs the Industrial Dust Task Force for WMMA. He also sits on the board of the New Haven Manufacturers Association (NHMA), and is a member of the Town of Woodbridge, CT Economic Development Commission. 

"Jamie Scott is going to make an excellent leader for this association," stated John Schultz, WMMA's outgoing president. "He has served WMMA and the industry at large on numerous levels, and is well prepared for the challenges of this position." 

WMMA, the Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America, is a nonprofit organization that develops and publishes standards guiding the proper manufacturing of woodworking equipment. WMMA standards are prevalent within the United States, used and contributed to by its over 150 member companies. 

- See more at: http:///The_Wood_Machinery_Manufacturers_of_America_appoints_Jamison_Scott_as_new_president_61767/#sthash.KGcBnC8k.dpuf


The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America appoints Jamison Scott as new president



1 May, 14:57
May 02, 2014. /Lesprom Network/. The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America (WMMA) appoints Jamison
Scott as new president, as WMMA said in the press release received by Lesprom
Network. 






Jamison has presented several combustible dust seminars and regularly
acts as a technical resource. He has authored several combustible dust articles
for national and international trade publications including Air Pollution
Control, Wood & Wood Products, CabinetMakerFDM, Wood Industry (
Canada), Woodshop News,
Chemical Engineering, and FDM Asia. Scott also serves on the Technical Advisory
Board for Air Pollution Control, a technical trade publication, and chairs the
Industrial Dust Task Force for WMMA. He also sits on the board of the New Haven
Manufacturers Association (NHMA), and is a member of the Town of Woodbridge, CT
Economic Development Commission.








"Jamie Scott is going to make an excellent leader for this
association," stated John Schultz, WMMA's outgoing president. "He has
served WMMA and the industry at large on numerous levels, and is well prepared
for the challenges of this position."








WMMA, the Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America, is a nonprofit
organization that develops and publishes standards guiding the proper
manufacturing of woodworking equipment. WMMA standards are prevalent within the
United States, used and
contributed to by its over 150 member companies.



- See more at:
http://www.lesprom.com/en/news/The_Wood_Machinery_Manufacturers_of_America_appoints_Jamison_Scott_as_new_president_61767/#sthash.KGcBnC8k.dpuf

The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America appoints Jamison Scott as new president

1 May, 14:57
May 02, 2014. /Lesprom Network/. The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America (WMMA) appoints Jamison Scott as new president, as WMMA said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. 
Jamison has presented several combustible dust seminars and regularly acts as a technical resource. He has authored several combustible dust articles for national and international trade publications including Air Pollution Control, Wood & Wood Products, CabinetMakerFDM, Wood Industry (Canada), Woodshop News, Chemical Engineering, and FDM Asia. Scott also serves on the Technical Advisory Board for Air Pollution Control, a technical trade publication, and chairs the Industrial Dust Task Force for WMMA. He also sits on the board of the New Haven Manufacturers Association (NHMA), and is a member of the Town of Woodbridge, CT Economic Development Commission.

"Jamie Scott is going to make an excellent leader for this association," stated John Schultz, WMMA's outgoing president. "He has served WMMA and the industry at large on numerous levels, and is well prepared for the challenges of this position."

WMMA, the Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America, is a nonprofit organization that develops and publishes standards guiding the proper manufacturing of woodworking equipment. WMMA standards are prevalent within the United States, used and contributed to by its over 150 member companies.
- See more at: http://www.lesprom.com/en/news/The_Wood_Machinery_Manufacturers_of_America_appoints_Jamison_Scott_as_new_president_61767/#sthash.KGcBnC8k.dpuf

The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America appoints Jamison Scott as new president

1 May, 14:57
May 02, 2014. /Lesprom Network/. The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America (WMMA) appoints Jamison Scott as new president, as WMMA said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. 
Jamison has presented several combustible dust seminars and regularly acts as a technical resource. He has authored several combustible dust articles for national and international trade publications including Air Pollution Control, Wood & Wood Products, CabinetMakerFDM, Wood Industry (Canada), Woodshop News, Chemical Engineering, and FDM Asia. Scott also serves on the Technical Advisory Board for Air Pollution Control, a technical trade publication, and chairs the Industrial Dust Task Force for WMMA. He also sits on the board of the New Haven Manufacturers Association (NHMA), and is a member of the Town of Woodbridge, CT Economic Development Commission.

"Jamie Scott is going to make an excellent leader for this association," stated John Schultz, WMMA's outgoing president. "He has served WMMA and the industry at large on numerous levels, and is well prepared for the challenges of this position."

WMMA, the Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America, is a nonprofit organization that develops and publishes standards guiding the proper manufacturing of woodworking equipment. WMMA standards are prevalent within the United States, used and contributed to by its over 150 member companies.
- See more at: http://www.lesprom.com/en/news/The_Wood_Machinery_Manufacturers_of_America_appoints_Jamison_Scott_as_new_president_61767/#sthash.KGcBnC8k.dpuf

The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America appoints Jamison Scott as new president



1 May, 14:57
May 02, 2014. /Lesprom Network/. The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America (WMMA) appoints Jamison
Scott as new president, as WMMA said in the press release received by Lesprom
Network. 






Jamison has presented several combustible dust seminars and regularly
acts as a technical resource. He has authored several combustible dust articles
for national and international trade publications including Air Pollution
Control, Wood & Wood Products, CabinetMakerFDM, Wood Industry (
Canada), Woodshop News,
Chemical Engineering, and FDM Asia. Scott also serves on the Technical Advisory
Board for Air Pollution Control, a technical trade publication, and chairs the
Industrial Dust Task Force for WMMA. He also sits on the board of the New Haven
Manufacturers Association (NHMA), and is a member of the Town of Woodbridge, CT
Economic Development Commission.








"Jamie Scott is going to make an excellent leader for this
association," stated John Schultz, WMMA's outgoing president. "He has
served WMMA and the industry at large on numerous levels, and is well prepared
for the challenges of this position."








WMMA, the Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America, is a nonprofit
organization that develops and publishes standards guiding the proper
manufacturing of woodworking equipment. WMMA standards are prevalent within the
United States, used and
contributed to by its over 150 member companies.



- See more at:
http://www.lesprom.com/en/news/The_Wood_Machinery_Manufacturers_of_America_appoints_Jamison_Scott_as_new_president_61767/#sthash.KGcBnC8k.dpuf

The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America appoints Jamison Scott as new president



1 May, 14:57
May 02, 2014. /Lesprom Network/. The Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America (WMMA) appoints Jamison
Scott as new president, as WMMA said in the press release received by Lesprom
Network. 






Jamison has presented several combustible dust seminars and regularly
acts as a technical resource. He has authored several combustible dust articles
for national and international trade publications including Air Pollution
Control, Wood & Wood Products, CabinetMakerFDM, Wood Industry (
Canada), Woodshop News,
Chemical Engineering, and FDM Asia. Scott also serves on the Technical Advisory
Board for Air Pollution Control, a technical trade publication, and chairs the
Industrial Dust Task Force for WMMA. He also sits on the board of the New Haven
Manufacturers Association (NHMA), and is a member of the Town of Woodbridge, CT
Economic Development Commission.








"Jamie Scott is going to make an excellent leader for this
association," stated John Schultz, WMMA's outgoing president. "He has
served WMMA and the industry at large on numerous levels, and is well prepared
for the challenges of this position."








WMMA, the Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America, is a nonprofit
organization that develops and publishes standards guiding the proper
manufacturing of woodworking equipment. WMMA standards are prevalent within the
United States, used and
contributed to by its over 150 member companies.



- See more at:
http://www.lesprom.com/en/news/The_Wood_Machinery_Manufacturers_of_America_appoints_Jamison_Scott_as_new_president_61767/#sthash.KGcBnC8k.dpuf