A Bittersweet Lesson - Sugar and Combustible Dust

From Chemical Info -

A Bittersweet Lesson

The Chemical Safety Board (CSB) reports that the sugar industry, in particular, has had a long love affair with both combustible dust and lackadaisical housekeeping methods. In fact, this trend dates as far back as 1925.
A Bittersweet Lesson | Chem.Info
Although Imperial Sugar may not be the lone offender of combustible dust crimes, it is perhaps the most memorable.
www.chem.info/Articles/2010/06/Safety-A-Bittersweet-Lesson/



Don’t Sweep Safety Under the Rug
An Occupational Safety and Health Administration Fact Sheet titled:
Hazard Alert: Combustible Dust Explosions offers specific dust control recommendations to help protect your facility from a similar fate:
  • Implement a hazardous dust inspection, testing, housekeeping and control program.
  • Use proper dust collection systems and filters.
  • Minimize the escape of dust from process equipment or ventilation systems.
  • Use surfaces that minimize dust accumulation and facilitate cleaning.
  • Provide access to all hidden areas to permit inspection.
  • Inspect for dust residues at regular intervals.
  • If ignition sources are present, use cleaning methods that do not generate dust clouds, such as industrial vacuums, which are designed to contain dust.
  • Use only vacuum cleaners approved for dust collection.
  • Locate relief valves away from dust deposits.
Meanwhile, the CSB recommends strict adherence to the National Fire Protection Agency’s following standards:
  • NFPA 61: Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Dust Explosions in Agricultural and Food Processing Facilities.
  • NFPA 499: Recommended Practice for the Classification of Combustible Dusts and Hazardous (Classified) Locations for Electrical Installations in Chemical Process Areas.
  • NFPA 654: Standard for the Prevention of Fire and Dust Explosions from the Manufacturing, Processing and Handling of Combustible Particulate Solids.
  • NFPA 70, Article 500: Hazardous (Classified Locations).

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Fire Triangle, Fire Tetrahedron and Dust Explosion Pentagon

How to Prevent Industrial Fires

LED technology reduces explosion risks